April 2015

2015 Jerez MotoGP Preview - The Season Starts Here, For Real This Time

Jerez is always a very special weekend. When Valentino Rossi described the first race back in Europe using those words, he spoke for everyone in the MotoGP paddock. Everyone loves being back in Europe, because the atmosphere changes, the hospitality units fill the paddock, the catering staff, hospitality managers, runners, cleaners, general dogsbodies – in other words, the people who actually do any real work – return to fill the paddock, and old friends are reunited after a long winter away, often doing something else to subsidize the meager pay they take for the privilege of working in Grand Prix during the summer. The paddock becomes a village once again, awaking from the long winter slumber.

The setting helps. The charming old city of Jerez is showing the first shoots of economic recovery, not yet enough to match the full bloom of spring happening on the surrounding hillsides, the slopes covered with wild flowers, but there is a much more positive vibe than there has been for some years. There is a sense of optimism. That sense of optimism flows into the paddock, already buzzing after a sizzling and surprising start to the 2015 MotoGP season. With over 100,000 people expected to pack the stands on Sunday, Jerez feels like the right way to kick off the long European leg of the championship.

The weather helps too. It is hot and sunny, with a long, dry weekend ahead of us. That will please everyone, giving them all a chance to actually work on set up. The track is short enough for them all to go out, test a set up, come back in and try something else, and with the weather holding, they can repeat that process until Sunday's race. For Andrea Dovizioso, this was key: with so much still to figure out with the brand new GP15, the factory Ducati men want as much dry weather and stable conditions as they can get. The bike has worked at every track they have been at so far, and Jerez was always a particular bugbear of the Ducati. Both Andreas, Dovizioso and Iannone are keen to see how the new bike will actually go around the track here. "I have a good feeling for this weekend, because the agility has improved a lot," said Iannone. Agility is key at this track, because of the many changes of direction. "I think this bike is ready to fight with the best," the Italian said.

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2015 Jerez MotoGP Preview Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone ahead of this weekend's race at Jerez:


Movistar Yamaha MotoGP Gears Up for First European Round of the MotoGP Season

Jerez de la Frontera (Spain), 29th April 2015

After a stunning victory from Valentino Rossi in Argentina a fortnight ago, the Movistar Yamaha MotoGP team flies back across the Atlantic Ocean to Europe for the Gran Premio de España at the Circuito de Jerez this weekend.

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2015 Jerez Moto2 And Moto3 Preview Press Releases

Press release previews from the Moto2 and Moto3 teams, as well as Dunlop:


European stage of season starts for Estrella Galicia 0,0 riders

Fabio Quartararo and Jorge Navarro arrive at the Circuito de Jerez this week for fourth event of the World Championship season. The Frenchman lies fourth overall with 39 points, with Spanish teammate twentieth with 4 points.

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EBR Press Release: EBR Forced To Pull Out Of World Superbikes

Despite promising results, especially from Niccolo Canepa, the EBR Hero Racing team is being forced to pull out of the World Superbike championship. The withdrawal became inevitable when EBR filed for bankruptcy. The EBR team, run by Larry Pegram, had hoped to find a way to continue, but without the backing of Indian motorcycle manufacturer Hero, did not have the funds. The press release issued by EBR announcing their withdrawal is shown below:


TEAM HERO EBR TO WITHDRAW FROM COMPETITION

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Pramac Press Release: Pramac Boss Paolo Campinoti On Pramac, Ducati And Mugello,

The Pramac Racing team issued the following press release with Pramac CEO and team principal Paolo Campinoti. In it, Campinoti discusses the link with Ducati, his fifteen years in the MotoGP paddock, and the emotional significance of racing at Mugello.


Campinoti: "Pramac Racing is our brand ambassador. And Mugello is our Maracanà"

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Dani Pedrosa To Miss Jerez, Aims For Le Mans Return

Dani Pedrosa will not be racing at the Jerez round of MotoGP. Despite the optimism displayed by Repsol Honda team principal Livio Suppo earlier this week, a test ride on a supermoto bike showed that Pedrosa's arm is not recovered sufficiently for him to be able to ride.

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Marquez And Pedrosa To Try To Ride At Jerez?

It appears that both Marc Marquez and Dani Pedrosa will attempt to ride at Jerez this weekend. Dani Pedrosa will get his first chance to ride a MotoGP bike after having radical surgery to cure a persistent arm pump problem, while Marc Marquez has just had surgery to plate a broken proximal phalanx in the little finger of his left hand.

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The 2015 World Superbike Season So Far: Close Racing, Sheer Superiority And Some Genuine Surprises

Four rounds into the World Superbike season and the contours of the 2015 championship are starting to become clear. Some of the things we expected to happen have unfolded much as predicted, but there have also been a fair few surprises. Time to take a quick look at the state of World Superbikes so far.

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Marc Marquez Breaks Little Finger In Training Crash, Questionable For Jerez

Marc Marquez has broken a finger in his left hand in a dirt track training crash. The reigning world champion fell heavily, suffering a displaced fracture of the proximal phalange in the little finger of his left hand. This means that the bone between the hand and the first knuckle was broken, and the two parts of the bone moved.

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Sam Lowes Speaks: Part 2 - On The Value Or Otherwise Of Data, And Of Following Your Own Direction

Data – the reams of information logged by a vast array of sensors on a racing motorcycle – is a contentious issue in MotoGP. Riders differ in their approach to it. Mika Kallio, for example, has a reputation for being a demon for data, wading through his own data after every session. Other riders pay less attention, preferring to let their data engineers, sort the data out from them, and examine their data together.

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