Sachsenring, Germany

Riders For Health Auctioning Exclusive Paddock Passes For Every MotoGP Race

The one place that everyone wants to be at a MotoGP race is in the paddock. Simultaneously, it is one of the most difficult places to get into, as, quite simply, Dorna does not sell passes into the paddock. The usual way - other than in a professional capacity, or working as a marshal - is to purchase a VIP package through one of the very few specialist travel companies authorized to issue paddock passes, such as our friends over at Pole Position Travel.

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Memory Lane, Part 3: The Sachsenring, As Seen By Scott Jones, An Encore

Scott Jones took too many fantastic photographs at the Sachsenring, so many that we've had to split our review of them over two days. Double the quantity, double the pleasure, and what better way to get 2010 started?


Wheelies whatever the weather


Colin Edwards takes the art of looking through the corner to the extreme

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Memory Lane, Part 3: The Sachsenring, As Seen By Scott Jones

Another day, another set of beautiful photographs taken by MotoMatters.com snapper Scott Jones. That weekend saw the weather play a major role, with race day finally drying up and producing three great races, including a scintillating MotoGP contest. Relive it all again in glorious color:


Valentino Rossi had things well under control in Germany


Still probably the best looking bike on the grid

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2009 MotoGP Sachsenring Race Report - Alien Invasion

The Aliens. That's what Randy de Puniet calls them. The Frenchman can find no other logical explanation for why Valentino Rossi, Jorge Lorenzo, Dani Pedrosa and Casey Stoner should be so much faster than the rest of the field. Certainly, the Yamaha is the best bike of the field, but in the hands of two-time World Superbike Champion Colin Edwards, it isn't half a second a lap or more faster. The Honda was the best bike of the 990 era, but only Dani Pedrosa has been able to win races on its 800cc cousin, even podiums being a rare event for anyone else riding the bike.

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The Last Of Scott Jones' Sachsenring Images

There's only so many compact flash cards that a photographer can carry, and the number of photos they can process is even fewer. So for now, here are the last of Scott Jones' Fab Photos frmm Germany


Forza Marco! Making the Hayate do things it has no right doing


Valentino Rossi in full effect


Colin Edwards: From now on, we're calling him "Sparky"

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Anatomy Of A Crash Part 2: Bradley Smith

It should be obvious by now that MotoGPMatters.com's shooter Scott Jones has a nose for the right place to stand in. After capturing Mike di Meglio's practice crash in perfect detail, Scott also grabbed Bradley Smith's second lap pile up with Finnish wildcard rider Eeki Kuparinen. Here's how it went:

Bradley slides off inside Kuparinen

They both hit the gravel

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Yet More Scott Jones Photos From The Sachsenring

If you enjoyed the previous instalments of photos from the German Grand Prix at the Sachsenring, you'll love the final collection from Scott Jones. If you want more after that, you'll have to wait until Donington, like the rest of us.


Jorge Lorenzo prepares to do battle


Marco Simoncelli tasted victory once again in Germany, and it was as sweet as ever


Tool chest, whiteboard, scarecrow - redefining multi-purpose

 

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Photos From Saturday At The Sachsenring

Yet more photos from Scott Jones, this time of the rain-soaked qualifying session. The conditions may have been horrific, but this did not deter either our intrepid photographer or the subjects he was shooting.


Jorge Lorenzo. He's supposed to be injured, but he refuses to let that deter him.


Niccolo Canepa, before Nicky laid the Kentucky Smackdown on him

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Aprilia To Field Moto2 Entry

Remarkable news surfaced at the German Grand Prix. According to knowledgable sources in the paddock, Aprilia is about to make an about turn on its previous resolution to walk away from the Moto2 class, and submit an entry. Work is apparently already underway, and the bike should be ready within the next month or so.

The news is little less than astonishing, for a number of reasons. Firstly, the introduction of four cylinder 600cc bikes as the Moto2 class, slated to replace the 250cc bikes at the start of next season, was taken against the express wishes of both Aprilia and KTM. KTM pulled out of the 250cc class a year early, stating their disgust at the way the decision had been forced through in the Grand Prix Commission as their main reason. The cynics in the paddock - of which there are plenty - pointed to KTM's failure to win a title in the 250cc class, and the severe financial constraints forced upon the Austrian factory by the global economic crisis.

Secondly, an Aprilia Moto2 entry would be powered by a Honda engine, the Japanese racing giant having been awarded the contract to produce and tune the engines. Just how Honda would feel if Aprilia starts winning races, claiming victory for the Noale factory while powered by a Honda lump, remains to be seen. The prospect of a Honda-powered Aprilia raised a myriad of questions about the prominence that Honda will be given on the bike, and just how that will fit in with the rest of the Moto2 team's sponsors. The thought of a bike with a huge Aprilia logo splashed across the fairing, and a tiny little sticker with Honda on, is both highly entertaining and deeply puzzling.

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