Preziosi: Rule Changes Forced Us To Push Up Costs

Since the global financial crisis struck home in MotoGP, and indeed all forms of motor racing, the dominant theme of all and any news about MotoGP has been about the need for the series to cut costs. There has been no shortage of ideas from team owners, journalists and Dorna CEO Carmelo Ezpeleta, all of which have included various proposals for rule changes, some more radical than the next.

The one group we hadn't heard from is perhaps the most important group, the engineers and bike designers. Fortunately, Motorcycle News' Matthew Birt had the bright idea of talking to Filippo Preziosi, the technical genius behind the Ducati Desmosedici bike which carried Casey Stoner to a championship in 2007 and 2nd place in 2008.

Preziosi's responses make absolutely clear the problems faced by anyone attempting to use the rulebook to cut costs: "Every modification to the rules pushed us to spend more money," he told MCN. He points out that every change to the rules forced the engineers to find ways to exploit the new rules as efficiently as possible, and try and get the most out of the new situation. All that R&D costs large amounts of money, and drastically pushes up costs.

The same holds true for any attempt to limit electronics, according to Preziosi. More money would be spent examining how to take advantage of a new rules package, and costs would go up. What's more, the Italian engineering genius points out, the rules would be almost impossible to police.

Preziosi's comments are interesting to us here at MotoGPMatters.com, because they fall in line with things we've been saying for several weeks now. As we pointed out in our series of articles on cost in MotoGP, the proposals being put forward by various commentators around the world would be more likely to increase costs rather than cut them.

And Preziosi's answer to controlling costs in MotoGP? Simple: "If we want to keep the costs under control the best thing to do is try and freeze the rules and have some stability," he told MCN. Rule changes are what got MotoGP into the parlous state it is in. More rule changes are only going to make things worse.

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